Daily Archives: February 28, 2014

New Releases – February 2014

Red Caps: New Fairy Tales for Out of the Ordinary Readers by Steve Berman (Lethe Press)

“The positivity that runs throughout the book, even in stories that end on gruesome or eerie notes, is the best part: the sense of ‘coming out’ in many of these pieces is also a sort of coming to life, or a coming into the self. The undercurrent of acceptance despite the odds is pleasant and heart-warming. These are stories about kids finding out what it means to be themselves, and how to be with other people. That’s good stuff…” — Tor.com

The Tyrant’s Daughter by J.C. Carleson (Knopf)

“A teenage girl from an unnamed Middle Eastern country attempts to come to terms with her dictator father’s bloody legacy in this absorbing character-driven novel authored by a former CIA official. … Laila is a complex and layered character whose nuanced observations will help readers better understand the divide between American and Middle Eastern cultures. Smart, relevant, required reading.” — Kirkus, starred review

Changers Book One: Drew by T Cooper & Allison Glock-Cooper (Akashic Books)

“A thought-provoking exploration of identity, gender, and sexuality. … An excellent read for any teens questioning their sense of self or gender.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

The Worlds We Make by Megan Crewe (Hyperion)

Book description: When Kaelyn and her friends reached Toronto with a vaccine for the virus that has ravaged the population, they thought their journey was over-but hope has eluded them once again. Now there is a dangerous group of survivors intent on tracking them down and stealing the cure no matter the costs.

Forced onto the road again, Kaelyn redoubles her efforts to find a safe haven. But when the rest of her group starts to fall apart, the chances for her success grow slim. Kaelyn’s resolve is strong, but is she willing to surrender everything in order to stay alive?

Boy on the Edge by Fridrik Erlings (Candlewick)

“Henry ‘had never seen anyone as ugly as himself’; his odd appearance and clubfoot make him a target for bullies, and his stutter and difficulties with reading lead him to keep his emotions bottled up. … a poetic and powerful novel.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Willow by Tonya Cherie Hegamin (Candlewick)

“A solid historical foundation, strong characterizations, and lyrical descriptions highlight Hegamin’s rich novel about slavery and black/white relations before the Civil War. … Engrossing and educational.” — Publishers Weekly

The Sound of Letting Go by Stasia Ward Kehoe (Viking)

“Learning that her parents plan to place her unpredictably violent autistic brother in a group home, accomplished trumpet player and responsible older sister Daisy Meehan experiments with bad behavior in her junior year in high school, trying to figure out how she feels about it. … An intriguing medley of music, teen romance, high school life and serious family issues.” — Kirkus

Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin (Candlewick)

“In a sorely needed resource for teens and, frankly, many adults, author/photographer Kuklin shares first-person narratives from six transgender teens, drawn from interviews she conducted and shaped with input from her subjects. … its chief value isn’t just in the stories it reveals but in the way Kuklin captures these teenagers not as idealized exemplars of what it “means” to be transgender but as full, complex, and imperfect human beings.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

The Unintentional Time Traveler by Everett Maroon (Booktrope Editions)

Book Description: Fifteen-year-old Jack Bishop has mad skills with cars and engines, but knows he’ll never get a driver’s license because of his epilepsy. Agreeing to participate in an experimental clinical trial to find new treatments for his disease, he finds himself in a completely different body—that of a girl his age, Jacqueline, who defies the expectations of her era. Since his seizures usually give him spazzed out visions, Jack presumes this is a hallucination. Feeling fearless, he steals a horse, expecting that at any moment he’ll wake back up in the clinical trial lab. When that doesn’t happen, Jacqueline falls unexpectedly in love, even as the town in the past becomes swallowed in a fight for its survival. Jack/Jacqueline is caught between two lives and epochs, and must find a way to save everyone around him as well as himself. And all the while, he is losing time, even if he is getting out of algebra class.

Storm by Donna Jo Napoli (Paula Wiseman Books)

“Napoli (Skin) draws from the story of Noah’s Ark in this account of a Canaanite girl, Sebah, with a big problem: rain, which sweeps away her family, home, and the ground beneath her feet. … Napoli’s focus on Sebah’s immediate circumstances allows her to grow organically as a character, bringing a satisfying realism to this familiar story.” — Publishers Weekly

Black Dog by Rachel Neumeier (Strange Chemistry)

Book Description:  Natividad is Pure, one of the rare girls born able to wield magic. Pure magic can protect humans against the supernatural evils they only half-acknowledge—the blood kin or the black dogs. In rare cases—like for Natividad’s father and older brother—Pure magic can help black dogs find the strength to control their dark powers.

But before Natividad’s mother can finish teaching her magic their enemies find them. Their entire village in the remote hills of Mexico is slaughtered by black dogs. Their parents die protecting them. Natividad and her brothers must flee across a strange country to the only possible shelter: the infamous black dogs of Dimilioc, who have sworn to protect the Pure.

Threatened by Eliot Schrefer (Scholastic)

“Schrefer switches focus from bonobos to chimpanzees in this engrossing, meticulously researched, and gripping tale of survival in the deep wilds of Gabon, a thematic follow-up to 2012’s Endangered. … Schrefer’s passion for the material and empathy for the characters shows on every page, and his non-human subjects are every bit as complex and fascinating as narrator Luc.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Happy Endings Are All Alike by Sandra Scoppettone (Lizzie Skurnick Books — re-release)

Book Description: Sandra Scoppettone’s 1978 lesbian young adult romance was a novel ahead of its time. The story follows the relationship between high school seniors Jaret and Peggy. At a time when girls were only allowed to date boys, Jaret and Peggy know they had to keep their love a secret. Of course, nothing goes according to plan, and before long they have to contend with the confusion and outright hatred of those closest to them. But nothing compares to the danger ahead, and the tragedy that will not just test their faith in their relationship, but their belief in themselves.

Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith (Dutton)

“Austin is in love with two people—his girlfriend, Shann, and his best friend Robby; neither of them is okay with it but, as Austin frequently repeats, ‘I was so confused.’ … Filled with gonzo black humor, Smith’s outrageous tale makes serious points about scientific research done in the name of patriotism and profit, the intersections between the personal and the global, the weight of history on the present, and the often out-of-control sexuality of 16-year-old boys.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

Feral Curse by Cynthia Leitich Smith (Candlewick)

“Campy humor is paired with themes of social justice in this fast-paced, clever second volume in the Feral series. … [T]he dynamics among characters are fascinating and are well-served by the first-person narration alternating between Yoshi and Kayla. A neat, smart middle novel that clearly sets the stage for an epic showdown between those who champion the rights of shifters and those blind to their humanity.” — Kirkus

The Tinker King by Tiffany Trent (Simon and Schuster)

“The prize for saving the world is having to do it all over again in this companion to the steampunk romance The Unnaturalists (2012). … lush, with a nice touch of Victorian post-humanism for an original twist.” — Kirkus